How to Hang a Quilt 2015

Since I originally posted this 3 years ago, this has by far been my most popular and most shared post! I thought I'd update it again and fill you in on some more things I've learned since then.


Finally, a way to hang quilts that is easy and fast! And best of all, there's no hole in the wall, which makes swapping out different size quilts possible without dealing with damage.

Supplies needed:
  • Quilt with sleeve. There are tons of sleeve tutorials online, just Google: Quilt Sleeve Tutorial. Here's a good one at Tallgrass Prairie.
  • 1 1/4" wide baseboard (Found at any home improvement store) 
  • Damage free hanging hooks (Like Command brand, found at all big box stores. No affiliation, just like them.)
I use these hooks that hold 2 lbs. each. They hold well, and
they also hold the baseboard flush with the wall.
(There are small ones that only hold 1 lb. each,
make sure you get the medium size that holds 2 lbs.)
Here's how you do it:
1. Measure your quilt to determine how far apart to place the hooks on your wall. I like to make my sleeves 2" shorter than the quilt so I can put the hooks an inch in on each side. That way, you can't see the hooks from the side once the quilt is hung. 


From the front (and side), you can't see the baseboard or the hook!

2. Determine how far down from the ceiling you'd like you quilt. Measure and mark lightly with a pencil where you want the outer 2 hooks. 

3. Place the hooks on the wall according to the package directions. 

4. Cut the baseboard to length and insert it in the sleeve. I use a long length of baseboard that's roughly 1 1/4" x 1/4" thick. DH cuts it to size. For smaller quilts, you can find shorter lengths that might not have to be cut.

5. Hang your quilt. 
It's really that simple to hang a quilt!

Things to keep in mind:
Heavy quilts will need more hooks. Space them equally on the wall and snip a small vertical slit in the sleeve that matches up with the hooks. You can weigh your quilt and baseboard to get an idea of how many hooks you'll need. Err on the side of too many rather than too few.

Some paint won't hold the hooks very well. I have quilts in almost all the rooms in my house and I have one room that hooks just won't stay on the wall. If this happens, you can still use the baseboard, but get a LARGE picture hanger and nail it in the wall. This is my plan B in that room.

Why baseboard? I like using baseboard because you can get it in long lengths. Dowel rods tend to come in shorter lengths - shorter than many of the quilts I want to hang. Plus they sag easily. You can experiment with other sizes of baseboard or dowels. But, anything less than 1 1/4" wide baseboard will show the hooks peeking out on the top of your quilt. I like the sleek look of the quilts hung with no hooks showing.

Gook luck hanging your quilts and let me know your results. If you come up with any helpful tips, let me know that too!


Comments

  1. I've been wondering about hanging the quilts I'm making. This will be a great help for me! Thanks!

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  2. Command Hooks can and have ruined walls. Two days before my daughter's wedding I was switching out one small, light weight wall hanging for another when the whole apparatus can down, leaving a 4" hole all the way through 7/8" drywall. A quick trip to the craft store buying hooks with a 6" block saved the glaring hole made by Command Hooks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm sorry that happened to your wall! That sounds horrible. I'm wondering how that happened - the sticky stuff doesn't seem that strong. I hope that doesn't happen to me! But I'll be on the look out...

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  3. What a great idea. Thanks for sharing.

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  4. Command Hooks are a renter's best friend. Thanks for your tutorial.

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  5. This is awesome, and I've never seen it done this way before. I actually am working on 3 large banner type quilts that will be hung in a school and was wondering the best way to hang them. The baseboard idea is genius, and I'm totally going to use it!

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  6. I have also had horrible results with Command hooks. I used them to hang an Advent quilt and ended up having to patch and repaint the whole wall. Not a fan. I use the method where you put screw eyes into the end of the wood and hang those on nails. Yes it leaves holes, but two small nail holes are way easier to spackle and paint than a whole wall.

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  7. Love this idea! I have been using Command hooks for years in all my rooms and in several different houses and never a problem - thank goodness! But for some reason, I never hung a quilt using them. But I will be for my next wallhanging. Thanks for the idea! :)

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  8. great idea. I use command hooks and clips to hang design walls. Very important to make sure you put the tape on facing the right way.

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  9. Am confused about step 5. What is.hanging on the hook? The board goes onto the sleeve, but how is the sleeve connecting to the hook? Thanks.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Karenlynne, The sleeve is slightly shorter than the quilt on each end so the board goes directly onto the hook. If I need 3 hooks to hang a larger quilt, I snip a hole in the sleeve were it lines up with the hook. Hope his helps!

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  10. Am confused about step 5. What is.hanging on the hook? The board goes onto the sleeve, but how is the sleeve connecting to the hook? Thanks.

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  11. I have the exact same question!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The sleeve is slightly shorter than the quilt on each end so the board goes directly onto the hook. If I need 3 hooks to hang a larger quilt, I snip a hole in the sleeve were it lines up with the hook. Hope his helps!

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